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Our History

The Sea Shepherds have fought tirelessly for whales, dolphins, tuna and seals. But we've also silently taken on the battle for sharks – an animal few believe is worth fighting for.

Julie Andersen mourns the loss of several immature sharks – all that is left of a community’s shark population after just a year of shark fishing. Photo: Shawn HeinrichsJulie Andersen mourns the loss of several immature sharks – all that is left of a community’s shark population after just a year of shark fishing. Photo: Shawn HeinrichsSea Shepherd has worked with many governments around the world to protect global shark populations from further decline. Most notably, we have a long-standing project in the Galapagos in partnership with the Ecuadorian government in which we have contributed more than one million Euros towards the acquisition of a patrol boat, the installation of vessel identification systems, training, enforcement, a team of fin-sniffing patrol dogs, and legal support for prosecution.

Sea Shepherd has a strong legacy dealing with shark issues around the world as well, from putting pressure on Disney in Hong Kong to take Shark Fin Soup off its menu, to working with an advertising agency in Singapore to create pro-active advertising for couples planning their weddings, to removing thousands of miles of long lines. View more of our history... 

Sea Shepherd has several direct action shark campaigns:

1) In the Galapagos, we are currently investing over 1 million euros to roll out a program that allows monitoring of even the remotest islands in the area with instant notification going to authorities when illegal fishing vessels enter the waters.

2) We are also continuing along our route of working closely with the public on education and awareness supporting the customs programs to ensure fins are not illegally smuggled out of the country. 

3) Sea Shepherd empowers global protection of sharks through local action.

4) Sea Shepherd Conservation Society has been confiscating longlines since 1989. We have taken illegal lines as short as 0.5 km (0.3 miles) and as long as 100km (62 miles). Since over 50% of sharks are caught as bycatch – many of which on longlines – we are doing are part to save sharks.