Commentary by Sea Shepherd Founder, Captain Paul Watson

The MV Sam Simon and the HDMS Triton. Photo: Sea ShepherdThe MV Sam Simon and the HDMS Triton.
Photo: Sea Shepherd
It really is unbelievable that Denmark is spending so much money deploying a frigate, a patrol boat, a helicopter and so many military personnel to defend the slaughter of pilot whales and dolphins.

I think this qualifies as a military engagement between the Kingdom of Denmark and Sea Shepherd. The pictures remind me of the British blockade of Napoleonic France or the U.S. blockade of the Southern States. It is a genuine military blockade. Sea Shepherd is flattered.

In light of recent Danish naval complaints of inadequate funding, the Danish people should be asking themselves – is this charade really worth the millions of euros in tax dollars it is costing?

Pilot whale and dolphin meat, which the Faroese brag is "free" meat, has now become the most expensive meat in the world – free to the Faroese, but extremely expensive for the Danes.

I wonder what those Danish sailors are thinking. So proud to be defending whale killers in the Faroes, a place that makes no secret of its open contempt for Denmark, yet welcomes Denmark’s military to defend the Grind.

Actually when you think about it, this is pretty damn smart of the Faroese. They get military force to protect the killing of pilot whales and other species of dolphins, and at the same time, they get to enjoy Denmark's embarrassment before the eyes of the world.

Here's to the Danish Navy
Defending Denmark, well maybe,
As the whalers laugh and jeer,
Cursing Denmark over their beer,
While eating whale with Danish gravy.

I challenged the whalers to a debate,
To discuss the mercury on their plate.
No one has come forth,
Of these pseudo-Vikings from the North,
So I'll simply be patient and wait.

 

Update from Sea Shepherd - Cat and Mouse at 12 Miles:

As the five Sea Shepherd volunteers who were arrested for defending pilot whales head into court today, the MV Bob Barker and the MV Sam Simon are at the 12 nautical mile limit of Faroe Islands.

The Danish navy vessel, HDMS Triton, is regularly found within the vicinity of the Sea Shepherd ships.

The small boat, Farley, remains in police custody in the Faroe Islands, despite the fact that charges against the Sea Shepherd volunteers which resulted in the small boat’s confiscation have been dropped.

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